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STEM Tuesday: Meet Betty Trummel

Do you know some of the differences between the Antarctica and the Arctic?

  1. Which one is a continent?
  2. Which one has no mammals?
  3. Which one is dedicated to research?
  4. Which one allows commerce?
  5. Which one is where Santa Claus lives?

Thanks to Betty Trummel, I do. Okay, I already knew that Santa lives at the North Pole and that’s the Arctic. I knew the Antarctic is a continent.  The Arctic is almost all ice and water, with small islands of land.  The Antarctica has no mammals, and it’s protected by a treaty, while the Arctic allows commerce.

The main purpose of the Antarctic Treaty, which was signed in Washington on December 1, 1959, is to ensure “in the interest of all mankind that Antarctica shall continue for ever to be used exclusively for peaceful purposes and shall not become the scene or object of international discord.”

Betty is school teacher, turned Antarctica expiditioner. Soon, 59 year-old, Betty will be off to a novel leadership program, Homeward Bound Projects. The program brings women of science together to hone their leadership skills and to talk about ways to encourage more girls and young women to take on science careers.

Betty Trummel - 1I met Betty a couple of weeks ago, through my freelance photo-journalist gig with McHenry Chronicle.  I get to meet so many interesting people through writing.  Sometimes I’m lucky enough to make new friends, too.  Betty and I hit it off right away.  We might have gabbed all night, if Loved-One hadn’t sent out a distress signal wondering where in blue-blazes disappeared to.  Oh well, Betty and I are getting together soon.  We share a passion for science. Maybe we’ll make it a pajama party.

Here’s a link to the full article, “Local women selected for novel leadership program.” You gotta see the photo of her eyelashes caked in ice.

Isn’t it wonderful to see Betty launch her career in a new direction?  Do you have a passion you’d like to explore?  I’d love to hear about it.

 

Published inPeopleUncategorized

2 Comments

  1. Thanks — love to see good female role models –wow, impressive project. I’ve been involved in getting young women into technology for the last 20 some years, as a college teacher in Technology — challenging, but rewarding. I’ll have to follow her project!

    • Adela Adela

      As a woman “of a certain age,” and one who’s always loved science and technology, I’d love to hear what challenges you face, Mary. Please keep in touch.

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