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Tag: NaPoWriMo

Outfit of the Week, BAM friend, and NaPoWriMo

Today is CeCi’s birthday and I’m spending the whole day with her. The BAM-16 Conference seems like just last week.  I reconnected with my friend, Doreen, who I met in person for the very first time at BAM-15. I met Doreen McGelligan virtually when I read and reviewed her book, BRISTOL STOMP last year. Here we are last year: And here we are this year. I picked this photo because I love Doreen. And because I got so many compliments about the way I tied my scarf. Yes! Even from the fashion bloggers! I did have my pink Hotter open-toed…

Gratitide and NaPoWriMo 

I love starting the week with gratitude.  Plus it’s NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month.)  Yay!  A challenge wrapped in blessings.  Umm…hmm. The challenge: write a poem that begins with a line from a another poem (not necessarily the first one), but then goes elsewhere with it. The poem I  picked is The Chambered Nautilus.  It’s the poem that my novel keeps circling back to, so it’s dear to me.  Still, I never had the patience to memorize it.. This is the ship of pearl, which, poets feign,  Two lips and cheek recline at table, A child’s repose.  As lovers’ ardor…

NaPoWriMo: Style from the Stylus

Well this morning I woke from an interesting dream: I dreamt I was sleeping and woke rested and raring to go.  Guess what?  I did. And I’ve got a lot to do.  Starting with back to poetry. Can I marry this prompt with a bit of Style from the Stylus? …think of a single thing or person (a house, your grandmother, etc), and then write a poem that consists of kenning-like descriptions of that thing or person. For example, you might call a cat a mouse-stalker, quiet-walker, bird-warner, purr-former, etc. If you’re looking for examples, you can find one that…

Photos and  NaPoWriMo Poetry

   Butterfly garden Outside winter lingers chilling, aggravating,  Holding on too tight while  body’s soul craves warmth. Inside, tropical rain forest orchids breathe relief Coaxing caterpillars to unfold. Squeezing out  last drop, old life attitudes memory. Wings stretch where once remembered wrinkles. Crawled slow, meshed to earth and e body and soul crave warmth Inside, tropical rain forest orchids breathe relief Coaxing caterpillars to unfold. Squeezing out the last of old life and ways, Wings stretch where once remembered wrinkles. Crawled slow, meshed to earth. Stretch and shiver, fold and reach. An unknown new beginning will be the end.limbs. Stretch…

STEM Tuesday: Heirloom Weeds

OMGoodness.  I almost forgot about Poetry Month.  Here it is and I missed 4 days already. I planned to share some info about genetic research of cannabis.  I never knew the innate difficulties scientists have mapping plant genomes. It’s partly because plants can’t run away or hide as a defense mechanism. So, instead they have different genes, duplicate genes that can be used in times of stress.  I never knew that since 1993, the THC in some strains of cannabis went from 3% to 37%. Scientists are busy working on what characteristics of which strains prevent nausea, enhance appetite, suppress…

OFOTW and NaPoWriMo Mashup

Today’s prompt: write a poem in the form of a review. You can review either animate or inanimate things, real places or imaginary places. You can write in the style of an online review (think Yelp) or something more formal that you might find in a newspaper or magazine. (I imagine that bad reviews of past boyfriends/girlfriends might be an easy way to get into this prompt, though really, you can “review” anything in your poem, from summer reading lists for third graders to the idea of the fourth dimension). “You’re never fully dressed without a smile” Miss G blooms,…

Mashup: NaPoWriMo, Gratitude Monday

It’s gratitude Monday and It’s CeCe’s birthday.  My gratitude is focused on her today. Today’s NaPoWriMo challenge: Wright a hay(na)ku). Created by the poet Eileen Tabios and named by Vince, the hay(na)ku is a variant on the haiku. A hay(na)ku consists of a three-line stanza, where the first line has one word, the second line has two words, and the third line has three words. You can write just one, or chain several together into a longer poem. For example, you could write a hay(na)ku sonnet, like the one that Vince himself wrote back during NaPoWriMo 2012! Gratitude for a Daughter Anticipating: A…

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